Month: April 2021

Digital expert Harvey Morton shares his experience of burnout and tips for helping yourself out of it 2020 has had a significant impact on people’s mental health. Likely, we won’t see the full effects for a while. The positive from this difficult situation is that people are happier than ever to openly discuss challenges with
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Europe’s stuttering vaccine rollout faced multiple hurdles on Friday as EU regulators said they were reviewing side effects of the Johnson & Johnson shot and France further limited its use of the AstraZeneca jab. The US drugs regulator said it had not found a “causal” link between the J&J vaccine and blood clots, but that
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The use of telehealth may have skyrocketed during the COVID-19 pandemic, but it also exposed a digital divide, speaker after speaker said during a panel discussion at the Society for Pediatric Dermatology (SPD) pre-AAD meeting. “We have seen large numbers of children struggle with access to school and access to health care because of lack of
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View of Corporate and Research and Development Headquarters of Regeneron Pharmaceuticals on Old Saw Mill River Road in Tarrytown, New York. Lev Radin | LightRocket | Getty Images Regeneron Pharmaceuticals said Monday it will ask the Food and Drug Administration to allow its Covid-19 antibody therapy to be used as a preventative treatment. The therapy,
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Initial clinical trials for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccines excluded pregnant women. Thus, pregnant women’s immune response to vaccination and the transplacental transfer of maternal antibodies to the fetus is not yet studied in detail. Recently, a group of researchers analyzed 122 pregnant women and their neonates at the time of birth.
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Children may not be as infectious in spreading SARS-CoV-2 to others as previously thought, according to new University of Manitoba-led research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). Our findings have important public health and clinical implications. If younger children are less capable of transmitting infectious virus, daycare, in-person school and cautious extracurricular activities may be
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Adding the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab (Opdivo) to neoadjuvant chemotherapy dramatically increased pathologic complete response (pCR) in patients with operable lung cancer, a randomized trial showed. The pCR rate increased from 2.2% with chemotherapy alone to 24.0% with the addition of nivolumab. The between-group difference increased in an analysis limited to patients who had complete
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Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center. Several vaccine sites across the U.S. paused administration of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine this week after adverse reactions were reported, according to The Associated Press. On Thursday, three vaccination sites in North Carolina closed temporarily after several people had
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Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center. Loss of smell, loss of taste, dyspnea, and fatigue are the four most common symptoms that healthcare professionals in Sweden report 8 months after mild COVID-19 illness, new evidence reveals. Approximately one in 10 healthcare workers experience one or more moderate-to-severe
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Vials labelled “COVID-19 Coronavirus Vaccine” and syringe are seen in front of displayed Johnson & Johnson logo in this illustration taken, February 9, 2021. Dado Ruvic | Reuters Johnson & Johnson is scaling back shipments of its single-dose Covid-19 vaccine by 86% next week as it grapples with manufacturing issues at a major plant in
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CAMBRIDGE, Mass.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Apr. 7, 2021– Moderna, Inc. (Nasdaq: MRNA), a biotechnology company pioneering messenger RNA (mRNA) therapeutics and vaccines, today highlighted the publication of antibody persistence data out to 6 months following the second dose of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine in The New England Journal of Medicine. “We are pleased that this new data shows antibody persistence through 6 months following
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The 24-hour news cycle is just as important to medicine as it is to politics, finance, or sports. At MedPage Today, new information is posted daily, but keeping up can be a challenge. As an aid for our readers and for a little amusement, here is a 10-question quiz based on the news of the
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Dr. John Atkinson, a Mayo Clinic neurosurgeon, explains pituitary tumors. Visit http://mayocl.in/2nTdykj for more information on care at Mayo Clinic or to request an appointment. Pituitary tumors are typically a benign tumor that presents in a focal area of the nervous system. The pituitary gland controls all of the endocrine functions of the body, from
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It’s never easy deciding when to quit vs. when to persist. With any ambition in life, there will be challenges and obstacles in your way. Most of the the time the answer is to stick with it, endure, practice discipline, and grind it out. But in some instances, the best option, the brave option, is
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Regardless of how you feed your baby, watching that little body so intent on taking in nourishment, all while nestled in the crook of your arm is a sight that will disappear all too soon. Even if you are nursing, the time will come when your baby will need a bottle.  We found in our
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The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Friday announced its first-ever approval of an artificial intelligence device to help find colon lesions during colonoscopy. The GI Genius (Cosmo Artificial Intelligence) identifies areas of the colon where a colorectal polyp or tumor might be located. Clinicians then follow up with a closer examination and possible
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Psychosocial stress – typically resulting from difficulty coping with challenging environments – may work synergistically to put women at significantly higher risk of developing coronary heart disease, according to a study by researchers at Drexel University’s Dornsife School of Public Health, recently published in the Journal of the American Heart Association. The study specifically suggests
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A proportion of chronic pain patients on prescribed opioids took chances with their medications over time, such as seeking early refills or giving pills to others — but such behaviors were intermittent, not persistent, according to data from the Australian POINT study. In a group of about 1,500 people with chronic noncancer pain surveyed every
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